Saturday, August 11, 2007

DANGER! Raisins and grapes can be LETHAL to your dog!!!

SAVE DOG LIVES!!! PLEASE SHARE THIS INFORMATION with ALL dog lovers you know as well as your veterinarian, groomer, pet sitter, classes, clubs, etc.

RAISINS & GRAPES Update
Based on report provided by VMRCVM Vet Notes
Animal Poison Control Center has documented multiple cases of grape and raisin poisoning in dogs within the last couple of years. Presumably, this has occurred in the past but attributed to other causes.


What Kind of Grapes & Raisins?
The source of the problem has been varied. Grapes of all varieties and growing conditions (including homegrown) have been implicated. Raisins are usually made from white seedless grapes, but all raisins of any source should be considered kidney toxic (chocolate covered raisins as well).


Why?

The toxic principle is unknown. Grapes contain low amounts of tannins compared to acorns, a known kidney toxicant in large animals. Grapes lack significant amounts of Vitamin D, another known kidney toxicant. It is unlikely pesticide residue is involved due to the wide variety of grape types involved. So far the majority of toxicosis reports have been in dogs. However, feeding grapes or raisins to cats and ferrets should also be discouraged, as poisonings have been reported in these species as well.


How Many Would Poison Your Dog?
The minimum toxic dose is approximately 0.3 oz/kg body weight. This would correspond to about 2 grapes per kg body weight, or roughly 1 grape per pound of body weight.
15 lb dog = 12-14 grapes could be deadly

25 lb. dog = 23 grapes could be deadly

50 lb. dog = 50+ grapes could be deadly

75 lb. dog = 75 grapes could be deadly
Raisins, having lost their water content are considered more toxic at 6 raisins per kg of body weight, or 2-3 raisins per pound of body weight. Think how many raisins are in ONE small snack pack of raisins – maybe enough to kill your dog.
15 lb. dog = 30-45 raisins could be deadly

25 lb. dog = 50-75 raisins could be deadly

50 lb. dog = 100-150 raisins could be deadly

75 lb. dog = 150-225 raisins could be deadly


What are the symptoms?
Symptoms appear 6-24 hours after the dog eats raisins or grapes (average is 12 hours). Initially, symptoms are gastro-intestinal signs, followed by kidney problems.Vomiting is usually the primary sign, with diarrhea, depression/lethargy, anorexia, colic, dehydration and sharply decreased urine output. The course of the toxicosis is anywhere from 3 days to 3 weeks. Dogs with kidney problems have a guarded to poor prognosis. Diagnosis is based on history of recent exposure and clinical signs. On bloodwork, the kidney values are increased. Typically BUN, creatinine, phosphorus and potassium are elevated (sometimes serum calcium as well). The urine sediment will have hyaline casts and the urine specific gravity will be either hyposthenuric or isosthenuric (diluted to the concentration of water of less concentrated than water) at SG 1.006 to 1.010.Treatment


What should I do if my dog has ingested raisins or grapes?
If the raisins or grapes have been ingested within 2-3 hours, vomiting should be induced followed by activated charcoal to limit further absorption. Treatment is based on preventing further absorption if appropriate and maintaining urine output & electrolyte balance. The vet may also give an osmotic cathartic (to speed up GI passage of toxin without absorption). The animal should receive an isotonic saline solution IV at twice maintenance rates for 48 hours. Anti-nausea medication, diuretics and peritoneal dialysis may be needed in some cases.

7 comments:

Mom to 2 boys said...

Thanks for sharing...I never knew. Luckily I've always had large breed dogs, so if I'd share a grape from time to time no harm no foul. (From the chart, it would take 75 grapes to do in my fatty!) Seeing the boys 'share' their food with him, and they get grapes diced into quarters, Logan is lucky if he gets the equivalent of 1 1/2 grapes at any given time!!! I'll have to be more careful in the future all the same.

momofj said...

My dog is about 65-70 pounds and ate about 40 grapes or so. It's been about 18 hours with no symptoms, do you think she'll be ok??

-The Mike- said...

I know this is an old post, but I don't understand your math on grapes and raisins. If raisins are more deadly, then how is it that there are more raisins than grapes required to poison a dog. If 23 grapes poison a dog, then a significantly fewer number of raisins should do the same if they are more dangerous. I just don't want someone to think their dog is safe based on these numbers and their pup comes to harm. My dog is almost professional at finding raisins to eat (we don't allow them in the house anymore) and I'm told by the vet that a handful 10-15 is enough to kill him (he's about 40lbs) a far cry from the 75-100 you suggest.

-The Mike- said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
LaineVert said...

I'm freaking out because I gave my puppy literally one grape. He's 5 months old and about 5.5-6 lbs. Do you think he'll be okay, or should I notify my veterinarian? I usually give him a bit of fruit every once in a while, like oranges or apples, so I didn't even think twice when I gave him the grape. I know the chart says that they need to consume a significant amount, but I'm still worried...

LaineVert said...

I'm freaking out because I gave my puppy literally one grape. He's 5 months old and about 5.5-6 lbs. Do you think he'll be okay, or should I notify my veterinarian? I usually give him a bit of fruit every once in a while, like oranges or apples, so I didn't even think twice when I gave him the grape. I know the chart says that they need to consume a significant amount, but I'm still worried...

gjhsdagfhjksagdfhksadg said...

My 70 lb. dog just ate like 6 oz of raisins will he be ok? He hasn't showed any signs but I made him throw up like 4 hours later when I got home